5 Things Employees Can Do, To Boost Their Earning Potential

(By Debbie DiVito)

Generally, I hate all generalisations.  But there’s one that has resonated with me since I started my career at Ernst & Young: In the workplace, there are “yes people” and “no people”; “solutions people” and “problems people.”  Instead of presenting your manager with problems, propose solutions.  View every obstacle as an opportunity to demonstrate your “can-and-will-do” mentality.

The equation is simple: If you want to get more from your employer, you have to prove you’re worth more. But who has time for that? Whether you’re a time-starved working mother or a hard-working employee with a life outside of the office, just the thought of committing time to diversifying your portfolio of professional expertise — in addition to your day-to-day duties — can seem exhausting. But it doesn’t have to be.

Recently, I’ve begun my own journey to furthering my professional development and taking my skill set to the next level, in the context of my existing duties. Are you looking for new ways to increase your value in the workplace? Here are six things you can do to boost your earning potential today:

1. Put time on your boss’s — or your boss’s boss’s — calendar.
If your team is anything like mine (I’m lucky enough to have a leader who practices what she preaches), communicating your aspiration for professional development will be openly and warmly received. Spend your time together defining your goals, or, if you have specific developmental areas in mind, use the opportunity to map your course. Good managers recruit talented employees; great managers retain them.

2. Look internally to expand your skill set.
Turn to your teammates to learn something new. Ask to collaborate on a project to help lighten your colleague’s burden and develop a valuable skill in the process. And if your colleagues are really nice, they might be willing to introduce you to select members of their extended network (e.g., agency partners and former colleagues) for informational interviews and networking purposes.

3. Research volunteer opportunities.
When social media became a viable communications channel for businesses years ago, I realized I’d need to get some practice flexing my social media muscle to stay relevant. So, when I learned of a volunteer opportunity to serve as the social media communications manager for a charitable organization near and dear to my heart, I stepped up to the plate. Three years later, social media strategy and content has become a big part of my work here at Citi.

4. Be a “yes” person.
Generally, I hate all generalisations.  But there’s one that has resonated with me since I started my career at Ernst & Young: In the workplace, there are “yes people” and “no people”; “solutions people” and “problems people.”  Instead of presenting your manager with problems, propose solutions.  View every obstacle as an opportunity to demonstrate your “can-and-will-do” mentality.

5. Take the assignment no one wants.
Even if it’s administrative or unrelated to your day-to-day work. Recognise these opportunities for what they are: chances to diversify your experience and set yourself apart. So raise your hand to volunteer; take the unpopular assignment and do something great with it.

(Source: Women&Co)

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