Poli-ticking in Nigeria and its roots

(By Michael Irene)

Learning to walk, oddly enough, has led Nigeria on wrong roads. She walked with civilians then into the barracks and back to civilians. After civilian rule turned the country into a skeleton, she ran into the barracks for cover. And, from the barrack, different monsters came up and raped her. Nigeria and Nigerians suffered under the hands of the military regime. No military leader moved the country forward.

In recent years, Nigerian politics has become a highly dangerous field, where every move requires methodological considerations and more rigorous analysis than one can deal with within this article. Like a game of chess, Nigeria’s politics, requires utmost thinking, patience and understanding.

Within the political construct, it is impossible to offer adequate and conclusive solutions for the macabre events happening daily. Certain clichés make proffering answers to the Nigerian problems hard; they are: beautiful imperialism, incurable corruption, unscrupulous leaders etc and etc. However, to build a path that can lead Nigeria out of the present cul-de-sac, a deep and surface study of Nigerian poli-ticking is worth a cursory look and, most importantly, how the polit-“ticking” ideas carry exosmotic features that alter the nation’s movement. To understand these lessons clearly, let us throw our eyes, briefly, to the beginning.

It started in 1914 when the Brits, without paying attention to the different religious and ethnic backgrounds in Nigeria, joined the people together for the benefit of British industrial classes. Nigerians, in the wake of the union, they claimed, developed agriculturally, economically, socially and so on. But, when the white man’s trick was discovered, Nigeria sought for freedom after forty-six years.

The same master who used the people for personal growth gave her freedom. A scholar describes the above con as follows: “if imperialism is understood primarily as an economic system of external investment and the penetration and control of markets and sources of raw materials, political changes in the status of colonies or former colonies will not greatly affect description of their economic system.” There is a persistent quest by westerners to own and control Nigerian people, Nigerian economy and the political atmosphere.

After the so-called independence granted to Nigeria, the country has not grown! The country is still a toddler learning to walk.

Learning to walk, oddly enough, has led Nigeria on wrong roads. She walked with civilians then into the barracks and back to civilians. After civilian rule turned the country into a skeleton, she ran into the barracks for cover. And, from the barrack, different monsters came up and raped her. Nigeria and Nigerians suffered under the hands of the military regime. No military leader moved the country forward.

The people shouted for the return of civilian rule. Is it not crazy that, in pursuit of democracy, Nigerians went into the barracks to look for that leader?

Nigerians picked a man from the barracks because he doesn’t wear military attire anymore. They forgot that a leopard’s spot is indelible. The man stayed there for good eight years and thought of turning power into a marathon race like he would have done if he were in khaki.

The system, right from history, was set to fail. Tisher tish us nonsense abeg! Let Nigeria look for what works for Nigerians.

It was this same system that now brought terrorism into Nigeria. This same system taught leaders how to be corrupt and how to put monies in foreign accounts. Terrorism requires funding. How the hell does boko haram, the Islamic sect, get funds? Internationally or locally?

As the years go by, useless old eggs that have been running “things” since the early eighties still run the country today, and Nigerians expect the country to move forward. Why do Nigerians like jokes?

Even after 2015, nothing will change. The system is still burdened by spoilt animals of the past. Imagine yourself cooking a fresh pot of soup with spoilt meat. What would it taste like?

The country is like a recycle bin. Recycle and use again.

A new group of leaders are wanted. A new people with a new mindset are required to shift the country’s focus. The people want new leaders not inspired by senseless godfathers. The people want a new Nigeria, period.

Source: Dailypost

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