Where Has Sanusi Lamido Sanusi Gone?

(By Nasiru Suwaid)

Since his ascension unto the throne of his forbearers, it seems many a citizen, be they ordinary individuals, governmental personalities, partisan politicians and even the Nigerian press, have become confused on the persona of the new monarch of Kano, whether he is the same individual they knew, who has had a principled disagreement with the federal government, while he was the governor of the Nigerian apex bank.

It was on the 13th of June of the year 2014 and the place was the Kano State Government House, where a large group of people had anxiously awaited the emergence of the new king, specifically, to escort him to the Friday prayers. It was a surreal atmosphere and period within the famous city, what with the organized violence, obviously to mask the disappointment of the enemies of the city, shock of an announcement and a Nigerian presidency tempted to challenge the will of God. It was a season where something that had never been done by the present crop of politicians, who do not have the stoic presence, manufactured veneration and established stature of the First Republic politicians, had somehow managed to be accomplished by a civilian governor, which is the enthroning of a new emir. The first shock that greeted the escorting party was when the car that would take him to the nearby mosque, was parked in front of the entrance of the Naseer House, the temporary lodgment inside the state governor’s expansive residence assigned to the emir, due to the refusal of the federal authorities to grant him access to his palace.

The surprising spectacle was the plate number of the Rolls Royce having the inscription; ‘Amir Kano’, rather than the usual; ‘Emir of Kano’ and of course, whom the palace courtiers announced as coming out was Alhaji Muhammadu Sanusi [II], instead of the very polarizing Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi. Since his ascension unto the throne of his forbearers, it seems many a citizen, be they ordinary individuals, governmental personalities, partisan politicians and even the Nigerian press, have become confused on the persona of the new monarch of Kano, whether he is the same individual they knew, who has had a principled disagreement with the federal government, while he was the governor of the Nigerian apex bank. Indeed, many who have had cause to disagree with him, during his intellectual pugilism, pioneering Islamic activism and opinion-editorial commentaries on the past positions he had taken, find it hard to situate what had actually happened in Kano. Indeed some mischievous persons, who are keen to always play to the gallery, have concocted a comparative comparison between what the new emir did and the canonical change of name of an emerging Pope in the Vatican.

Despite whatever the exponents and champions of the modern secular democracy could say, the originating root of the concept of an organized state is largely theological, which emerged from the preaching and workings of the Prophets of the Abrahimic Faiths. Who not only taught the society the way it should pray but how it must govern itself and one of the fundamental requirements of the creation of a stable state is the formation of a firm authority, which must be so strong as it should be just to the poor, caring to the weak and benevolent to all. Within the realm of Christendom and particularly the Catholic Church, a Pope is nothing but the representative of Lord Jesus Christ, while from premises of the Islamic faith, an Amir is a vice gerent of Almighty Allah or representative of God on earth. For such individuals whom fate and destiny has placed with such a heavy burden, a life on the secular throne of earthly leadership as well as serving as spiritual guides to their communal nations, the life before the ascension, the personality before the throne and past trivial disagreements, petty squabbles and mere differences in opinion would never seem so important or even relevant.

In fact, the confusion about the persona of new emir Muhammadu Sanusi [II] reared its ugly head last week, when he withdrew the suit filed by Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, challenging his removal from office as the Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria. Some had wondered why he should forgo his rights that have been infringed by the federal government, while others have pondered why he would not seek for a declaratory protection for the future occupants of the chair at the apex bank and the press went to the ridiculous extent of a withdrawal of suit and an apology in lieu of recognition by the Nigerian authorities. The simple truth is while Mallam Sanusi has a personal and individual rights that he can enforce, Emir Muhammadu Sanusi [II] does not have such rights, as he is the embodiment of the institution of the Kano land, while the Kano Emirate Council could sue for wrongs done, he as the king cannot sue. It is like saying Queen Elizabeth could sue anyone in Her Majesty’s Crown Court as an individual and not as the embodiment of the State of Great Britain, the trite norm is the king in his personal capacity does not sue his subjects or institute a charge against himself as the embodiment of the institutional state.

Of course, some would easily argue that the British ruling dynasty is a constitutional monarchy, while the Kano ruling dynasty is not but just like the Vatican state, the leadership which drives its legitimacy from religion, only have the Covenant of God as its constitution, which is the directive commandment of the most high in the Holy Books of Faith. These are states that do not require an effective supervision of an army or even a police force, as it is the loyalty of the people to authority which makes everyone to conform, be obedient, respect the law and imbibe the spirit of patriotism. Thus for those who still insist in having an altercation with Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, unfortunately, he is no more or he doesn’t exist anymore , however, for those who wish to test of the graceful eminence of the Emir of Kano, the populous might of the nearly 20 million subjects is surely an enough deterrence.

Source: Abusidiqu

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